Tag Archives for " Licks "

10

Using Octaves in Guitar Solos

Adding the octave, or perfect 8th interval onto some of your licks can really add a totally new flavor to your guitar solos.

If you’d like to learn more about intervals and the scales, checkout my Guitar Scale Patterns course.

In this lesson, Colin demonstrates how you can use the octaves all over the fretboard. The general rule for finding the octave is to go down 2 strings and up 2 frets… however you have to be careful, because if you’re crossing the 2nd string (B) you’ll need to add one more fret onto that pattern for it to work correctly. Colin talks about this in the lesson.

The hardest part about getting this riff down correctly is learning to mute the string in between the two notes you’re playing. In general, I like to rest my index finger lightly on that in between string to cut down on any noise it produces. It’s worth practicing a bit just to make sure you can get a clean interval while you’re strumming.

Alternatively of course, simply finger pick both notes together, or one after the other, and avoid the problem entirely.

You can find many more guitar lessons by Colin Daniel at RiffNinja.com.

Using Guitar Octaves In Your Solo:

Watch the Guitar Octaves lesson on Youtube

13

Guitar Fills in D Major

I love improvising – just noodling around in a given key and having a generally good time jamming away on the guitar. A big part of that is in creating fills or riffs in between chords… So today’s lesson is purely to give you a few ideas that you can use to get started creating your own fills. In this video I’ve only looked at D major, and even as is, it’s a bit on the longer side.

Remember, the chords in D major are D, G, A (the I IV V major chords), and the relative minor chords: Bm, Em, F#m.

If you don’t understand where this came from, I’d recommend checking out my Unlocking I IV V lesson as in that lesson I explain how and why chords work together, which is a critical foundation for doing stuff like the improvising and fills we’re talking about today.

So once you’ve got your chords down for the key you’re working in, take one of them and have a look at the scale that it comes out of. In this case, the relative minor of D major is B, and because we’re using open chords, the B minor scale with its root on the 5th string (2nd fret) is ideal. Again – I go over this in a lot more detail in my Guitar Scale Patterns lesson.

Now that you know what chords you’ve got, and what scale is nearby, simply start trying notes or interval combinations from within that scale, and see what you come up with!

Here are a few that I enjoy using:

Watch Guitar Fills in D Major on Youtube

For More Riffs Like This One, Click Here

46

Pentatonic Riffage

There’s really no limit to what you can do with the pentatonic scale, and the absolutely coolest thing about it is that as long as you’re playing in the right key, you literally can’t go wrong with the pentatonic scale. Any single note you grab from there will work over top of whatever you’re soloing on top of.

A fun exercise you can do to convince yourself of this fact is to strum a couple of chords, then pick at random a note from the pentatonic scale, then play the next 2 or 3 notes in the scale, then strum another chord.

You literally can’t go wrong. It’s awesome!