Learn How To Play Guitar With These Free Lessons!

 

Learn How To Play Guitar With These Free Lessons!

  • Chords, strumming and rhythm
  • How to find your way around the fretboard
  • How to use scales and riffs
  • Improvising and soloing lessons

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Do You Want To Learn How To Play Guitar?

Or maybe you’ve already played for years – decades even! – but now you’ve picked up the guitar again with fresh determination and you really want to clear up some questions that you’ve had for a long time, and most importantly, take your guitar playing to a whole new level, farther than you’ve ever been before?

If so, welcome, because you’re in the right place. My name is Jonathan Boettcher, and I’ve helped thousands of guitar players improve their playing.

Why My Method Works

Many guitar players have learned to play with the “monkey-see, monkey-do” method, where essentially they’re copying what others play, without any real understanding, and without gaining the ability to apply those skills creatively for themselves. My teaching method is the reverse – first giving you understanding of what is happening on the guitar, and then learning how to apply it. As such, hundreds of guitar players have written me with stories of their progress.

How To Use This Site

At PlayGuitar.com we have many free guitar lessons where you can learn how to play guitar without dropping a red cent. I encourage you to take advantage of these – the best way is by signing up for my newsletter at the top of this page, where you will get one lesson per week. However, if you really want to accelerate your guitar playing faster than a short lesson once per week can manage, I highly recommend checking out my guitar courses.

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Our No Weasel Clauses Satisfaction Guarantee makes trying our guitar lessons a no-brainer! If you’re not happy with the lesson for any reason, let us know, and we’ll give you a full refund. Guaranteed.

  • Recent Guitar Lessons

    I just read a cool article talking about how science has finally proven that the bass player is the most important member of the band. Ha, go figure eh? Being both a bass player and a guitar player, I'm okay with that news 🙂 Anyhoo, reasons why, being: Our brains recognize and adjust to changes in rhythm more quickly when a lower frequency is used Our brains associate the bass…
    I came across this guitar lesson from Joe Bonamassa recently, and as I was watching, I realized that a lot of the movements he really loves are based on thirds and inverted thirds! He doesn't call them inverted thirds, but he should, I guess! An inverted third is simple a normal third turned upside down. Say for instance, G to B is a major third, right? Well, an inverted third…
    A lot of guitar players treat strumming and picking as separate skills, and rarely allow the two to meet... which is a shame, because they ARE separate skills, but once combined, they allow access to so much more than either skill could access individually. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt8-SFj7h6E Watch on Youtube In today's guitar lesson, we're going to look at one of the examples out of my Dynamic Rhythm Guitar course from the…
    If you want to make your rhythm guitar playing really sound interesting, let's face it: sooner or later you're going to have to begin using single note lines. Strumming can take you a long ways, if you're clever, but it can only take you so far. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgn2IzLGAFo Watch on Youtube Single note lines need not be complicated either - in fact, simply playing through the notes in a G major…
    Okay - QUICK - before anybody's eyes glaze over... an inverted third is simply another way for saying "this sounds awesome!" in musical geek-speak. I know that sometimes throwing around lingo like this shuts some people down, but it is my firm belief that understanding what we play makes us better players. But never fear, we're not going into the theory angle today, we're just learning a riff. In the…
    Here's a fun little trick you can use to add some additional character to your chord progressions - add some drone notes. What do I mean by that? Simply adding a note that remains constant throughout each chord change. Kind of like how a bagpipe always has that drone going on underneath the melody. Oops, did I mention bagpipes and guitars in the same thought? Yikes! 🙂 Actually, side story…
    Well it's been a little while since I shot a lesson for you guys, so this time I thought I'd at least change up the background a bit! Today we're going to learn a cool chord progression: Em G D A, and a couple licks. The first lick is pretty simple - it's just straight up through the E pentatonic minor scale. Here's some basic tab, for those who need…